Woodworking for Women

TedsWoodworking Plans and Projects

As a woman who is also a self-taught woodworker I am passionate about getting more women to try their hand at this rewarding craft. It’s not easy; believe me I know, to break into a world that has, for so long, been dominated by men. Everything about woodworking says, “Big hands, thick arms, strong back needed.” From the tools to the sheet goods, this business does everything it can to discourage women. Still, women persist. I know that I am far from the only one out there who enjoys creating and crafting in wood.
Wood is a sensual medium. It has warmth and a mystique that are hard to match in any manmade material. Touching a finely crafted, lovingly finished rocker evokes images of a mother rocking her crying baby to sleep. A deftly crafted, beautifully inlaid humidor draws forth the image of a wood paneled reading room; its cherry wood shelves filled with leather bound classics.
The forms of wood are boundless, limited only by your imagination. Woodworkers have long crafted amazingly intricate 3 dimensional puzzles, drawn complex pictures with the natural colors of woods from all over world, built intriguing and whimsical furniture that baffles the imagination. To be a woodworker is not to define you as a woman who makes jewelry boxes, or a woman who makes chairs. To be a woodworker is to define you as someone who expresses your talents, your creativity, your need’s and your dreams with wood. What shape, what size that turns out to be is entirely up to you.
Becoming a woodworker is an endless journey of discovery. There is always something new to be learned, or an old skill to be refined. There are new tools to broaden your reach, classes to hone your skills, a lovely piece of wood waiting for you to bring it back to life. So, let’s get started: Lesson number one is: Have faith, you can do this!
From tools, to lumber to plans there is a lot to be learned and that, of course, can be intimidating. Many women, and men for that matter, are not too sure that they are at all comfortable with the concept of power tools. The famous Tim Allen “More power!” grunt on the “Home Improvement” sitcom made us just a little bit leery of tools that get plugged into an electrical outlet. Will that thing with the long sharp point take off without us? What about that blade whirling perilously fast not too far from our finger tips?
Prudence around power tools is not to be dismissed lightly still, with patience and caution; power tools are no more dangerous than driving a car. And, just as you didn’t pop the keys in the ignition and drive off without practice; safe and proper use of power tools is also a learned skill, which you can master if you choose.
Also, much like your choice of transportation, power is not the only way to get around. Woodworkers have been building incredibly useful and beautiful furnishings for far longer than power tools have been around. Some years ago I was fortunate to take a tour of Thomas Jefferson’s estate at Montecito. Jefferson is, of course, renowned as an inventor, architect and designer and his inspiration shines in Montecito. And yet, not a stick of furniture was made with a power tool. Each and every dovetail was hand cut, every inlay meticulously fitted.
There are still many woodworkers today who prefer hand tools. Indeed quality hand tools abound, many of them reproductions of 19th and 20th century tools beautifully finished and a joy to hold and use. I think it would be safe to say that most home woodworkers use a combination of power and hand tools. Power tools make quick work of sizing lumber and sheet goods, while hand tools create a sense of intimacy with the wood; slowing our work and allowing us time to truly enjoy the rhythm of the shop.
The only way to know which tools you will prefer, or even which form of woodworking will speak to you, is to get out there and start creating. Bang a few nails into the new deck, put a finish on the bookcase. Just let your hands take you where you heart desires.

There are still some important info related to articles about Woodworking for Women. As well as some examples of pictures related to the above article you can access here MORE INFO

Thank you for reading the article above. Many important points you need to know.
Have you ever:
– Wanted to build something, because you cannot find it “retail”?
– Thought of making something custom for a specific need?
– Struggled to find detailed plans to build your dream project?

TedsWoodworking Plans and Projects