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Why Projects For Learning? – Part II – The Means

My daughter wants to do woodworking for her vocational – business project. It is a popular choice. But woodworking, like all projects, takes money to practice and learn. Plus, woodworking requires expensive equipment and professional expertise.
How do we connect a costly and potentially dangerous professional-level occupation with the interests and desires of a twelve-year-old girl? This is an important question that goes to the heart of all real education. And the answer is not to give her a block of wood, a hand saw, and a sanding block and say “This is it.”
Modern education has developed its own answer. You take one teacher, give him or her two dozen students in a room filled with expensive equipment (repeated 6 times in a day), and give those students simulated, or pretend, work. I substitute taught a shop class once; how sad! You put large groups of students together and they are absolutely far more interested in each other than anything else. That is why shop classes have been almost completely phased out of modern learning, with the students given even more dullness they will never use in real life in their place.
Real learning costs money. And it must exist in the real and the practical to be real.
Much of life is business. By removing our children from the practical world of business – of meeting people’s needs, of figuring costs and hours and prices, of satisfying customers – we effectively neuter them from reality.
So, it is not shop class that I will give my daughter. (It helps that I am a professional woodworker and have the expensive tools.) I will teach her business – finding out what a customer needs and making that item out of wood to the customer’s expectations. This approach limits and focuses her woodworking experience. It is her business.
All of us live entirely on the proceeds from successful business. That’s why “non-profit” education is so unprofitable, especially for the children, it is divorced from the elements of successful business, by which all of us gain our living.
And so woodworking becomes a means of business and the business becomes a means by which my daughter will be able to pay for her own education. She certainly does not have to stick with woodworking as a business, what she learns can be applied to almost any of the projects she does during her middle school years.
A “free” education does not exist. We pay on average $7000 a year per child. But by divorcing children from that reality, modern education can do nothing more than teach fiction.
As home school parents, there is no reason why we also are required to teach fiction.
Project-Led and Business-Based Learning is the only approach to education that addresses the means of education in the context of the child’s experience. Every project requires an accounting of the costs and the hours. Each child engaged in Project-Led Learning must be engaged in some aspect of business throughout his or her experience.
And so woodworking, for my daughter, will be a means to an end. The end is to bring profit to the world by satisfying the requirements of a customer. The means to her own education will be in her own hands, for life.

There are still some important info related to articles about Why Projects For Learning? – Part II – The Means. As well as some examples of pictures related to the above article you can access here MORE INFO

Thank you for reading the article above. Many important points you need to know.
Have you ever:
– Wanted to build something, because you cannot find it “retail”?
– Thought of making something custom for a specific need?
– Struggled to find detailed plans to build your dream project?

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